New Medicare Rule Encourages Doctors to Test for Alzheimer’s Disease and Offer Care Planning

A new Medicare rule will promote earlier diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Medicare will now reimburse primary care doctors who conduct an Alzheimer's evaluation and offer information about care planning to elderly patients with cognitive impairment.

Posted on February 2, 2017

According to the Alzheimer's Association, more than 5 million Americans have the disease. In addition, more than 85 percent of Alzheimer's patients also have another chronic condition. But many are unaware that they have Alzheimer's disease because they haven't been diagnosed.

Under the new rule, primary care doctors who test patients for cognitive impairment can bill Medicare for their services. Testing for Alzheimer's disease can involve taking a thorough medical history, testing a patient's mental status, doing a comprehensive physical and neurological exam, and conducting blood tests and brain imaging. Previously, there was no specific Medicare reimbursement for dementia testing, so many doctors did not take the time to do it.

In addition, doctors can bill Medicare if they offer help to Alzheimer's patients with care planning by providing information on treatments and services. Receiving early diagnosis and proper care planning can be critical for Alzheimer's patients. According to Robert Egge, Alzheimer’s Association Chief Public Policy Officer, "Proper care planning results in fewer hospitalizations, fewer emergency room visits and better management of medication — all of which improves the quality of life for both patients and caregivers, and helps manage overall care costs.”

While Medicare will now pay for dementia testing and care planning, Medicare does not pay for long-term custodial care services for Alzheimer's patients. Medicare's nursing home coverage is limited to skilled care provided by a physical therapist, registered nurse, or licensed practical nurse.

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